Inviting Suggestions on the Draft Blue Economy Policy

Last Date Feb 27,2021 23:45 PM IST (GMT +5.30 Hrs)
Submission Closed.

With a coastline of nearly 7.5 thousand kilometres, India has a unique maritime position. Nine of its 29 states are coastal, and the nation’s geography includes 1,382 islands. ...

With a coastline of nearly 7.5 thousand kilometres, India has a unique maritime position. Nine of its 29 states are coastal, and the nation’s geography includes 1,382 islands. There are nearly 199 ports, including 12 major ports that handle approximately 1,400 million tons of cargo each year. Moreover, India’s Exclusive Economic Zone of over 2 million square kilometres has a bounty of living and non-living resources with significant recoverable resources such as crude oil and natural gas. Also, the coastal economy sustains over 4 million fisherfolk and coastal communities. With these vast maritime interests, the blue economy occupies a vital potential position in India’s economic growth. It could well be the next multiplier of GDP and well-being, provided sustainability and socio-economic welfare are kept centre-stage. Therefore, India's draft blue economy policy is envisaged as a crucial framework towards unlocking country’s potential for economic growth and welfare.

The MoES prepared the draft blue economy policy framework in line with the Government of India’s Vision of New India by 2030. It highlighted the blue economy as one of the ten core dimensions for national growth. The draft policy framework emphasizes policies across several key sectors to achieve holistic growth of India’s economy. The document recognizes the following seven thematic areas.

1.National accounting framework for the blue economy and ocean governance.
2.Coastal marine spatial planning and tourism.
3.Marine fisheries, aquaculture, and fish processing.
4.Manufacturing, emerging industries, trade, technology, services, and skill development.
5.Logistics, infrastructure and shipping, including trans-shipments.
6.Coastal and deep-sea mining and offshore energy.
7.Security, strategic dimensions, and international engagement.

The Ministry of Earth Sciences (MoES) has rolled out the Draft Blue Economy policy for India by Inviting suggestions and inputs from various stakeholders including industry, NGOs, academia, and citizens. The draft blue economy policy document outlines the vision and strategy that can be adopted by the Government of India to utilize the plethora of oceanic resources available in the country.

Click here to read the Draft Blue Economy Policy.

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4409560
ARUN KUMAR GUPTA 1 month 2 weeks ago

Tourism in India was limited to few known locations such as Agra, Jaipur, Varanasi, Khajuraho etc.
Rest of the country was totally ignored.
Perhaps because there was no better connectivity.
Now, the scenario is changing. Good roads can take the tourists directly to remote villages having remains of ancient civilizations. Many small cities are connected with regular flights. It is easier for tourists to reach places of their interests without wasting time in traveling.

4409560
ARUN KUMAR GUPTA 1 month 2 weeks ago

We are not able to utilise the full potential of tourism in India.
We have potential for spiritual, medical, religious tourism, remains of ancient civilizations, historical monuments, arts and handicrafts, high mountains of Himalayas to vast coast lines.
Every village can be a tourist spot if properly projected.
Despite having so much for interest of everyone, we are nowhere in global tourism.
We expect that few foreign tour operators to do marketing for us. Why shall they do so?

32620
Gaytri B Kabra 1 month 2 weeks ago

The government and the private sector will need to make large-scale investments to harness
the resources of the sea. Only then there will be marked increase in food from the seas,
fisheries, aquaculture, shipping and port facilities, marine technology development and
research as well as recovery of minerals, drugs and other assets from the sea bed.

32620
Gaytri B Kabra 1 month 2 weeks ago

The lack of collaboration and coordination between the public and private sectors in the
maritime domain needs to be addressed comprehensively. It is desirable to encourage ample
mobilisation of inter-institutional linkages across the sectors and underline the need for
reforms in order to fill in gaps in legislation and enforcement mechanisms.

860
Vilas Rajput Rajput 1 month 2 weeks ago

Aqua culture is getting popular in Kerala and there is good scope for further development. Arrangements for quality fish seeds may be made available by promoting good fish hatcheries.

32620
Gaytri B Kabra 1 month 2 weeks ago

Considering the size, level, stakes and rich potential of the Blue Economy, the government
or industry by itself cannot hope to achieve much. Hence, it is essential to adopt a holistic
strategy anchored in Public Private Partnership (PPP). It should be designed to accelerate
growth, while ensuring sustainable development.

700
SachithCS 1 month 2 weeks ago

Aqua culture is getting popular in Kerala and there is good scope for further development. Arrangements for quality fish seeds may be made available by promoting good fish hatcheries.

700
SachithCS 1 month 2 weeks ago

1. Thousands of houseboats are operated in Kerala. Pollution of backwaters is a big problem there. Hence a detailed study and remedial measures at international standards have to be implemented.

2. Lakhs of labourers are working in fishing and connected fields. Their security measures may be given priority when the blue economy policy is framed.

3. Aqua culture is getting popular in Kerala and there is good scope for further development. Arrangements for quality fish

32620
Gaytri B Kabra 1 month 2 weeks ago

The Earth’s resources are limited, while the needs of humankind – and the world population
itself – are on the rise. It is, therefore, imperative to plan on maximising the utilisation and
harnessing of oceanic resources. However, this should be done in a thoughtful, essentially
Gandhian manner, ensuring an optimal focus on sustainable development. In practice, this
amounts to according equitable priority attention to three key elements, namely Growth,
Employment, Protection of Environment.